Tropical Plantain Oatmeal Bowls with Coconut & Mango

No grains, but all the glory! These hearty oatless plantain oatmeal bowls from https://meatified.com are naturally sweetened & will get your day off to a sunshine-y start.

Sometimes recipe ideas don’t quite turn out exactly like you expected in The Land Of Frustrated Recipe Testing. Which is where this plantain oatmeal creation came from.

I got my hands on some obnoxiously delicious mangoes last week and I couldn’t get the idea of Thai sweet sticky rice with mango out of my head. I thought perhaps the stickiness of an almost ripe plantain might come close to the texture of that coconut-y rice once it had been simmered in coconut milk.

As it turns out, I was a little off the mark, because the plantain cooked out a little softer than I would like, so it didn’t quite have the bite and chew I would have liked to come close enough to a sticky rice type of dessert.

But my kitchen mistakes are your kitchen gain, because while I’ve got to go back to the drawing board on the sticky rice side of things, I did think that this accidental plantain oatmeal was a keeper!

No grains, but all the glory! These hearty oatless plantain oatmeal bowls from https://meatified.com are naturally sweetened & will get your day off to a sunshine-y start.

Honestly, I waffled back and forth on whether to call this a plantain oatmeal or a plantain rice pudding. There’s not a huge difference in texture, but I felt that this probably came down closer to oatmeal because it’s a little softer and although the plantain does have a little bite, it’s not really hugely visible or separate from the coconut milk it’s simmered in.

Either way, this plantain oatmeal actually works well as either a breakfast or a dessert. It just depends on how you’re feeling and what time of day it is. This recipe makes enough for two people as a breakfast bowl, but it would serve four as a smaller sized dessert. You do you!

I’ve posted quite a few grainless oatmeal recipes here over the years and they’ve always has a winter squash base as their hidden veggie superpower. (Yes, you can turn vegetables into Apple & Cranberry Oatmeal, Banana Bread Oatmeal or even Golden Milk Oatmeal with Orange & Spices!).

And while those are some of my favorite breakfast comfort foods, they have a couple minor down sides: they make a rather large batch, even when using something smaller like acorn squash, my usual go to, and they require you pre-cooking a squash before you can start making oatmeal.

No grains, but all the glory! These hearty oatless plantain oatmeal bowls from https://meatified.com are naturally sweetened & will get your day off to a sunshine-y start.

The advantage of this plantain oatmeal is that you can make it one bowl at a time if you like, and it requires no pre-cooking. So you can have a sweet-as-you-like bowl of plantain oatmeal on the table in 15 minutes or less. Options are nice. Speedy & simple grainless breakfasts are even better. (For even more AIP breakfast recipes, here’s what I recommend!)

To boost things up a little, I do like to add a couple of scoops of unflavored collagen peptides into these plantain oatmeal bowls (I like this one), because I personally do better with a little protein in the morning, but I don’t always have something to hand or time to cook a second thing in the mornings.

When it comes to picking out your plantains, choose those that are yellow with a good smattering of black spots. You don’t want them to be black-ripe, because you need plantains that will hold up to being grated, so choosing them when they’re still sweet, but not soft will give you the best result. I did choose to add a little natural sweetener with a smidge of raw honey and a smattering of golden raisins, but those are also optional if you’re trying to keep your sugar down.

No grains, but all the glory! These hearty oatless plantain oatmeal bowls from https://meatified.com are naturally sweetened & will get your day off to a sunshine-y start.

How you like your oatmeal is open to about a million interpretations, but I like mine thick and hearty off the stovetop, then to finish it in the bowl with some extra coconut milk or coconut cream, like you see above. Feel free to adjust the thickness and creaminess to your taste.

And if you’re gonna go all out with the toppings, I highly recommend topping the plantain oatmeal bowls with some toasted coconut, as well. My favorite way to do that is with these insane caramel sea salt coconut chips. Do it: you won’t regret it!

Are you looking for more AIP breakfasts?

I highly recommend checking out 85 Amazing AIP Breakfasts! It’s a community cookbook filled with recipes & ideas to broaden your breakfast horizons.

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Tropical Plantain Oatmeal Bowls with Coconut & Mango

No grains, but all the glory! These hearty oatless plantain oatmeal bowls from https://meatified.com are naturally sweetened & will get your day off to a sunshine-y start.
  • Author: Rachael Bryant / Meatified
  • Prep Time: 5 mins
  • Cook Time: 10 mins
  • Total Time: 15 mins
  • Yield: 2

Ingredients

To garnish:

Instructions

  1. PEEL: Pick plantains that are yellow with some black spots. You want the plantains to be leaning towards the sweet side, but still firm enough to grate without becoming mushy. Cut off the peel at both ends, then slice the plantains in half. Score the raised edges along the length of the plantains with a knife and peel them. If the skins are still a little tough and cling to the plantain, carefully slice them off from the fruit with your knife, making sure to get rid of all the black spots.
  2. GRATE: Use the coarse side of a box grater and carefully grate the plantains. Lay the grated plantain out on a chopping board and roughly chop the pieces once or twice, into smaller, rice-like sized pieces.
  3. SIMMER: Add the grated plantain, coconut milk, water, cinnamon, ginger, mace and salt to a saucepan. Bring the liquid to a boil, then reduce the heat a little until it’s bubbling away, but not boiling. Cook, stirring often, until the plantain has softened and the cooking liquid has reduced down and thickened, about 5-6 minutes.
  4. ADJUST: If you like, add additional water or coconut milk to thin the plantain oatmeal to your taste, and keep on the stove until it’s is warmed through. Remove from the heat. Add and stir through the golden raisins, then add the raw honey and / or collagen peptides, if you like.
  5. SERVE: Garnish each bowl with some of the sliced mango, plus additional coconut milk or cream, a sprinkle each of extra raisins and toasted coconut, plus a pinch of cinnamon on top if you like.

 

No grains, but all the glory! These hearty oatless plantain oatmeal bowls from https://meatified.com are naturally sweetened & will get your day off to a sunshine-y start.


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5 comments

  1. Wondering if this would work with green plantains – I don’t love the banana-ness of yellow ones. Thinking I’ll give that a try!

    1. I haven’t tested it myself, but I don’t see why not – I know that there are traditional recipes made with green plantain. They’ll be tougher to peel and grate, and you’ll need to increase the cook time, I would think 🙂

  2. Hurray, now I have another delicious plantain recipe. I had 3 large yellow/black plantains and decided to go the banana nut bread flavor route. My bananas were too soft to grate so I mashed them with a fork. I also added an egg white, ground flax seed, chia seeds, and chopped walnuts. It was SO good and I miss eating my oatmeal. Thank you for the recipe, it’s definitely a keeper.

    1. Oooh, that sounds so good and I love the mix-ins you added. So glad you’re enjoying your oatmeal! 🙂

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